This Monkey is going to Heaven

I’m pleased to announce that last night I completed my final pass of error checking through of Monkey 2nd Incarnation. Its been a good 2 years since I made the dedicated decision to do a 2nd edition of the game and after all the hard work put in, not only by me but a host of others it looks fantastic and exceeds my expectations. Especially in the art department – +Peter Frain, +Daniel Barker and +jon hodgson have excelled here and produced illustrations that are a joy to behold. After the school run, I’ll be uploading it to DriveThru, sending out complimentary pdf copies to backers and ordering a print proof and generally starting the Begining of the End to get the book in other people’s hands ūüėÄ (fingers xed wc 19th March)

This is my final 2nd Incarnation development post, I’ll let that just sink in ūüôā

It might be cold and rainy outside, but it doesn’t have to be inside

So said one of my Kung Fu teachers many moons ago, when we turned up with long faces, and miserable spirits to class one cold January evening. I then went on to have one of the most fun and enjoyable classes I ever had. As a result, I find that sentence a nice little effective pick me up that never fails to work for me. It’s also quite true of the current state of Monkey and related projects. Its been a while since I posted anything here, back in November, and it might seem that after the excitement of the Kickstarter a year ago things have cooled off. Not so. These updates over at the Kickstarter pages explain how hot things are getting:

Read the posts for full details, but the short of it is the main Monkey Rule Book is now 88% fully through its first editorial/proofing pass, we are art complete, so layout and final check are all that stands between release in Feb for backers/March for general release.  Mandate is not far behind, so I anticipate that should be April/May. Then monthly/Bimonthly releases for everything else (Ministry of Thunder adventure book, Golden Book of 101 Immortals supplement, Monkey Companion and Dragons Ascending to Heaven). 2018 is finally the year of the Monkey.

Monkey on Tour!

Another thing to look forward to I’ll¬†be running the Mega Monkey in the form of The Mandate of Heaven at the upcoming 7 Hills (Sheffield March 24-25) and Continuum Conventions (July 20-23), in its three table version. Then Mandate gets retired and Ministry of Thunder takes over for a short run over Furnace (Sheffield October 7-8 ) and possibly Dragonmeet..

Monkey Quickstart

This is done but I’ve been holding¬†off releasing this publically until one month before the rulebook book is ready. This 50-page pdf has a concise¬†version fo the main rules,¬†enough to play an included example adventure with two sets of four premade characters. The first set being the characters from the book, i.e. Monkey, Pigsy, Tripitaka and Sandy. The other being the sort of diverse set of four characters you can create using the rules in the main rulebook.

Finally, if all this isn’t enough to cheer you up during the grey month of January, here’s the last bit of art that Dan Barker did for the main rulebook, the Boy-God Demon Hunter Prince Natha.

 

 

 

Updates on Monkey and the Mandate of Heaven

This Monkey Monday I’m busy updating the Kickstarter backers of where I’m up to.

Monkey the Roleplaying Game has gone to final proof is more or less art complete (in the sense I might go “Oh I need a picture of the Jade Emperor!” i.e. last minute¬†stuff) and I’m expecting to have the pdf out and to backers just before or just after Christmas.

Here’s the Wind Lord Feng Po as drawn by Peter Frain, one of the last batch of art.

Feng Po, a wind immortal, by Peter Frain

The Mandate of Heaven got its first run through of all three worlds running on three separate tables running in parallel at Furnace back at the beginning of October.

The Great Hall of Games!

Intermission snacks!

Dan Barker has done illustrations of all 15 pre-made characters.

Here’s Inevitable Sunshine from the Western Heaven.

 

 

This is my interpretation of the Story, Make it Yours

This following fragment is from the Narrator’s advice chapter, where I talk briefly about the tricky issue of presenting the setting information. For many role¬†playing games, setting information is portrayed as an unassailable beacon of truth. For many reasons, this isn’t the case in Monkey. If you want to learn why and how the game deals with this, read on:

The biggest mistake I made in presenting the first version of this game was that I expected everyone to have read the novel and be on the same page with their appreciation. I believed, wrongly, that there was a homogeneous presentation of Monkey King, mainly because I had only been exposed to a very limited selection of the adaptations of the tale (mainly the 80s Japanese TV Series and the Arthur Whaley translation Monkey). This¬†assumption was a mistake since the Monkey King is a Chinese culture hero, in the same way as Robin Hood is to the English, and there are numerous TV series, films, comics and translations of the novel. Some of them stick faithfully to the book, and some are the creator‚Äôs take on the tale. The sources that I give¬†in the Bibliography section of the game are the sources I pulled on when putting together this second incarnation of the game. It‚Äôs a much broader selection of media, which has had an enormous impact on how the game is written, from the narrative frameworks, the assumptions surrounding the non-player immortals, to the game mechanics themselves. It‚Äôs still just a drop in the ocean of the massive body of work that‚Äôs been worked on and reinvented over hundreds of years. ¬†Thousands if you take into consideration that the Journey to the West incorporates earlier folk tales that have blended with the historical journey of the real life ‚ÄėTripitaka‚Äô who travelled the Silk Road to India to collect the lost scrolls of Buddhism.

Your experience with the Tale of the Monkey King may be different than mine. It might be more detailed, or this may be that this is the first time you have come across him. The important thing is that you don’t let your level of knowledge put you off. Read the book, follow the rules and guidelines and play the game. Between you and your players co-creating the story of your little band of Pilgrims as they go to Inidia to collect the lost scrolls.

The Origin of YOUR Monk

Tripitaka contempatles the illusionary nature of reality by Dan Barker.

Tripitaka contemplates the illusionary nature of reality by Dan Barker.

Gosh, it’s been a while ( summer holidays and all that), but work continues getting the core rule book together.

One of the new pieces I’ve written¬†for the second version of the game is a section that allows you to create your version of the Tang Monk, Tripitaka¬†in the book/film/tv series, who the player Immortals are responsible for¬†escorting safely to India.

This process is a much shorter version of player immortal creation, which produces a character whose weakness and abilities can be called upon by the players during play as well as being a Narrator controlled character who can berate them for their moral shortcomings and keep the more boisterous in line.

The following is an extract, the unedited Step 1 which determines the monk’s origin story.

Step 1. Origin Story

Like the player immortals the monk has an origin story

Here are some examples, with card randomiser. Like the player Immortal creation system, players may modify the following examples or come up with their own. The examples are meant to inspire not restrict.

(Club) They had a profession before they entered the Monastery. A war weary solider or a Mandarin sick of the politics of the outside world. They have the skill associated with that past profession, e.g. Solider or Mandarin , at Rank 5 but are loathe to use it. Players may use it once per session, but the next session the Monk will politely decline and it is unavailable for use.

(Spade) Bon to poor peasants they were left at the Monastery’s gates and raised as a monk from childhood. They have a Buddhist 5. Instead of Buddhist 4.

(Diamond) The monk is a Fox Spirit, whose parents thought it would be a fun prank to see how the child from such a colourful background coped with the austere upbringing of the Monastery. The monk may be completely oblivious to their supernatural nature.  Under Magic put Shape change (Fox to Human) and Trickster spells.  The monk will be unwilling to use their magic abilities and will only use them in a situation where harm may befall someone as a result. Even when they use them, like monks with a prior profession, they will refuse to use them next gaming session.

(Heart) They are an advanced Buddhist soul reincarnated in the monk’s body.  The monk in addition to any other attitude they gain in step 2 below automatically have the attitude Kindness, which is both Yin and Yang! This is because this advanced soul understands how to be gently kind, soothing another’s pain with soft words, as well as showing tough love and doing things for the recipient of their kindness that they may not immediately appreciate. Write it down as Kindness (Yin and Yang) on the Monk’s record.

(Jack) The monk is being sent to India to atone for being disruptive to monastery life. They are young and inexperienced and their Abbott is convinced that the trails they will face on the road will straighten the out. In addition to the Weakness generated in Step 3 write down ‚ÄúYoung and Na√Įve‚ÄĚ.

(Queen) The monk is a female nun.

(King) The monk was the Abbot of their Monastery.  They have the Skill Mandarin at a rank of three, which shows their skill in administration.

(Joker) The monk is a Demon, who initially attempts to tries to sabotage the mission to collect the missing scrolls. Initially their attempts are subtle and covert, but become increasingly obvious. When the player immortals confront it and successfully overcome it, it repents and swears and oath to successfully complete the mission.¬† The Demon Monk, has the magical abilities Shapechange and Invoke Fear and the skill of Demon and the Weakness ‚ÄúProne to resolving problems with violence‚ÄĚ.

Site Recommendation Innerjourneytothewest.com

I’m trying very hard not to make Monkey a dissertation on Eastern Religion/Philosophy (even on a personal level) since that would completely defeat the purpose of it being a game. Every now and again I’m having to dip into the more intense explanations to explain some of the ideas that the game rests on. For example this morning I’ve written a brief paragraph or two about Buddist and Taoist takes on Sin/Virtue which is are very very very different to western views.
Overall I’d rather people dip their toes in the deeper context of the novel, but have a good time.:)
One site that goes deeply into the Philosophical and Alchemical nature of the book, and discusses, for example, the symbolism of the main characters, is “Inner Journey to the West”.